Tag Archives: Tiger Woods

The 22 Times Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods Played in The Same Major

You may not realize this, but the two greatest major champions in golf history — Jack Nicklaus with 18 and Tiger Woods with 14 — actually crossed paths in the majors on 22 occasions.

In a recent interview with Cigar Aficionado, which you can watch here, Michael Jordan — arguably the greatest basketball player in history — was asked who he believed to be the best golfer of all time.

It was no surprise that His Airness, who also happens to be a golf aficionado, wasn’t falling into that trap.

“They’re both great and I would never say one is greater than the other,” Jordan said.

Jordan also said, “Jack and Tiger never played against each other. They never played in the same tournament. They never played with the same equipment. They never played with the same length of golf course. I never played against Wilt Chamberlain. I never played against Jerry West. To now say that one is greater than the other is being a little bit unfair.”

Not all of that is entirely true, though we do understand Jordan’s point. Woods and Nicklaus actually played in many of the same events early in Tiger’s career, but at that point, the Golden Bear was well past his prime while Tiger was coming into his own.

Since the talk is always about majors when it comes to Nicklaus and Woods, we decided to breakdown the 22 occasions in which the two played in the same major.

A couple of fun stats that came out of this:

  Nicklaus got the better of Woods on five of the 22 occasions, most notably his T6 to Tiger’s T8 in the 1998 Masters when Nicklaus was 58 years old.

   In four of the five majors where Nicklaus bettered Woods, Woods was still an amateur.

   Perhaps most remarkably of all, in the 22 majors where Woods and Nicklaus were both in the field, Woods collected seven of his 14 majors and finished in the top 10 nine times.

Tiger Woods happy with where game is despite Sunday struggles

Tiger Woods made it interesting again, but slipped from contention on the last day of a tournament.

Despite being done in by some poor putting at the Memorial, he believes there still was valuable progress.

“I keep getting a little better,” the 42-year-old Woods said after shooting an even-par 72 on Sunday at Muirfield Village. “Week in, week out, I keep getting just a little bit more fine-tuned. For instance this week, just to be able to make the slight adaptations after the first nine holes and be able to flip it around and shoot a respectable number.”

Woods started the final round five shots off the lead, the third time this year he has been within five to start the last day and couldn’t turn it into a win. Bryson DeChambeau won the event in a playoff.

Playing in the Memorial for the first time in three years, Woods birdied two of the first five holes Sunday before hitting from a fairway bunker on No. 6 to the rough in the back of the green. Still, he managed par.

He hit his approach over the green on No. 7 and settled for par again. He couldn’t make up any ground on the par-3 No. 8, either, leaving his second shot just short of the hole.

Missing a 3-foot par putt on No. 10 was a killer. He made a slick birdie on the par-5 No. 11, but missed a 7-foot birdie putt on No. 12, then hit his tee shot out of bounds on the 13th and finished with a bogey.

He bogeyed the par-3 No. 16 when he missed another short putt, an unfortunate trend for Woods in a week when he was hitting the ball well off the tee.

He now turns his attention to the U.S. Open in two weeks.

“I just need to hit better putts,” he said. “This week I didn’t really have, didn’t feel comfortable with my lines, and my feel was a little bit off. Consequently, I missed a bunch of putts. But I hit it really good this week, so that’s a positive going into Shinnecock, where ball striking is going to be a must.”

Moving up and then falling back has become a trend for Woods in his comeback bid.

He was one shot behind going into the final round at the Valspar Championship in March and finished tied for second, a shot behind winner Paul Casey. He was five back at the Arnold Palmer Invitational the next week, but couldn’t do better than a tie for fifth, eight shots behind winner Rory McIlroy.

He knows he has to improve but is happy with his game overall, especially because before back surgery in April he didn’t know if he would ever walk again, let alone play competitive golf.

“Overall, if I just keep building on this, with how I’m hitting it right now, I’m in good shape for two weeks from now,” he said.

His participation dialed up the energy level here all week, with thousands following him on the course and roaring their approval with every good shot. The crowds were supportive and respectful all week, he said, and he tried to just appreciate being here again.

“It’s incredible to be able to play golf again at this level,” he said. “Not to have any worries about being able to walk again, like I was. I was struggling there for a while, and now I’m on the other end of the spectrum.”

DeChambeau chuckled when asked whether he was hoping Woods would make a run Sunday so they could duel it out. He answered with a firm “no.”

“To be able to have this type of caliber (of players) all chasing is kind of special,” he said. “I knew I had to go out there and play well. I couldn’t make many mistakes.”

17 years ago today, Tiger Woods overcame 7-shot deficit with seven to play at Pebble Beach

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By T.J. Auclair
PGA.com

Golf fans everywhere, including Hampton Roads, love Tiger Woods.

If, like most of us, you’re bummed out about the recent setback in the return of Tiger Woods — back spasms that forced his withdrawal after one round in Dubai last week and have his future unclear — allow us to take you back to a happier time in Tiger’s career.

On this day 17 years ago,Feb. 7, 2000, Woods remarkably overcame a seven-shot deficit with seven holes to play to defeat Matt Gogel in the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am to claim his sixth consecutive PGA Tour victory.

That win allowed Woods to tie Ben Hogan, who won six consecutive starts in 1948, for the second-longest streak in professional golf history. Byron Nelson holds the all-time record with 11 consecutive wins in 1945.

RELATED: A timeline of Tiger Woods injuries, setbacks and returns

Tiger’s win at Pebble that year marked the 17th of his career. Since then, he has won an eye-popping 62 more times. The Pebble triumph was also the second of Tiger’s nine wins for the 2000 season, which also included the first three legs of the “Tiger Slam” — the U.S. Open (also played at Pebble Beach that year, a major Woods won by a record 15 strokes), Open Championship and PGA Championship. He would complete that slam with his win at the Masters in 2001.

Woods fired an 8-under 64 in the final round and it included this incredible eagle hole-out at the par-4 15th from 97 yards:

Gogel, of course, gave Woods a little help with four bogeys over his final nine holes to lose by two.

“I’m not the first pro that has struggled on the back nine at Pebble, and won’t be the last,” said Gogel, 28 at the time. “Trying to win a golf tournament for the first time, battling the emotions, it was quite a test.”

T.J. Auclair is a Senior Interactive Producer for PGA.com and has covered professional golf since 1998, traveling to over 60 major championships. You can follow him on Twitter, @tjauclair.